The tradeoffs

Updated: October 26, 2022

So, which function should you use? For low-frequency interrupts, you can almost always get away with InterruptAttachEvent(). Since the interrupts occur infrequently, there won't be a significant impact on overall system performance, even if you do schedule threads unnecessarily. The only time that this can come back to haunt you is if another device is chained off the same interrupt—in this case, because InterruptAttachEvent() masks the source of the interrupt, it'll effectively disable interrupts from the other device until the interrupt source is unmasked. This is a concern only if the first device takes a long time to be serviced. In the bigger picture, this is a hardware system design issue—you shouldn't chain slow-to-respond devices on the same line as high-speed devices.

For higher-frequency interrupts, it's a toss up, and there are many factors: